Compiling with biicode: CMake, build process, IDEs and more

biicode knows how source code files connect to each other. With this information, it creates a boilerplate CMake layout to build your project automatically. biicode then detects how sources connect and builds a dependency graph following #includes and implementations generating, for each block, a CMakeLists.txt defining variables to the dependency graph detected.

This translates into a CMakeLists.txt file with just one line by default:

Even though the boilerplate might be enough for some projects, here’s a guide to fully control the building process.

Today, we explain the different options available in biicode once you’ve got your CMakeLists.txt ready.

Compiling with biicode

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When CLion met biicode

Cross post from the CLion team: biicode integration in CLion!

C and C++ have a long history going back to the early days of programming. Over three decades, many interesting tools have appeared in the field: debuggers, compilers, memory analyzers and code analyzers for these languages are evolving swiftly. But how about a dependency manager? Can C/C++ developers save their time by configuring and installing various libraries used in their projects?

Luckily there is a very interesting cross-platform tool called biicode. With biicode, you can reuse any single source file from any given project in any other project you are developing. It tracks and manages versions of published code and retrieves the missing files from the repository (GitHub and Bitbucket are supported for now). In its latest versions, it supports boost libraries, Eigen and many others, and can even work with Arduino boards. The original content is here.

biicode plug-in for CLion is here!

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