Boost libraries are now supported in biicode

As a C++ developer I love the Boost libraries. They are one of the highest quality and best suited C++ libraries in the world, with the spirit and design of being fully compatible with the standard library and its practices.

However, Boost is not easy to love. It’s shipped with tons of inter-dependencies, even circular dependencies, and that’s only for header-only libraries (thankfully 80% of Boost is header-only). For non header-only libs, it’s a true pain. You should compile those and then link against, being careful about what you are doing.
Even if setting up Boost manually could be a bit hard, when it works it’s a pleasure to develop with it.

At biicode we have been working hard to simplify the process, to make Boost available for any C++ programmer with just an include. But this is only the start, the project has been released as open source to allow everyone contribute and help.

I hope you like it.
Boost libraries are finally supported in biicode

Continue reading

Our Story (II): Miguel Hernando’s road to entrepreneurship

How did biicode begin?

…certainly not in a parking lot, but Pablo San Segundo and I were pretty close to the one at the University the very first time Diego explained biicode to us.

I consider myself lucky for being part of biicode’s birth. The day we decided its name, or those endless meetings with a chalkboard full of diagrams, the first “battle logo” as we named our first “company mascot”.
In addition, I really enjoy my work as a university professor and engineer. Thanks to the university I have had the opportunity to devote myself to something that fascinated me since I was a child: robotics. But you cannot master robotics without solid programming skills, so I’ve been programming since I started hacking the fascinating Commodore 64, with its “peek” and “poke”, and his incredible voice synthesizer accessible through a simple command: “say”.

Hacking Commodore 64 is the beginning of our story

Hacking the Commodore 64 was classy.

Continue reading

A quick approach to BITSCAN

This is is a small explanation about BITSCAN, the C++ library exclusively developed by Pablo San Segundo.

BITSCAN is dedicated to the efficient processing of bit strings. In programming, a bit string is a data structure that stores collections of 1s and 0s. It gets interesting when those 1s and 0s refer to a Boolean property of a group, so that each element of this group is identified by a bit of that chain.

Time to move your pawns forward

A good example of this is the game of chess. In a chessboard each position is formed by six different types of pieces with two possible colours. A string of 64 bits can encode the position of all pieces of the same type and color on the board (e.g. “white pawns”) by referring each bit to a square with the semantics of a value to 1 (TRUE) if the square is occupied by a piece of the chosen type and 0 (FASLE) otherwise. Continue reading

Build a smiley mechatronic face today with biicode and arduino!

Control 12 servo motors located in a mechatronic face. It uses a makey makey board to switch between controllers: a wii nunchuck or a tv remote control.

This biiday project comes in by Julio Caso, one of our users!

mechatronic face biicode

Follow this step by step recipe to successfully build this project. If any doubts come, just post a comment!

Continue reading

bii internals: C vs Python efficiency

In our bii internal series we’ve walked through the process to convert our python code into C code, compile it as a python native extension to distribute it for different platforms. One of the major drawbacks of using native code is that we are not supporting all systems but, on the other side, we gain in efficiency and have more control over the environments where the app runs. We’re doing some benchmark to see how much faster is biicode processing projects: running all in python code or with the native extensions.

Continue reading

bii internals: How to do your own Windows Installer

As a continuation of the previous post, which introduces the way in which installers for several systems are automatically generated, we will discuss now the solution adopted for windows.
The main tool used for packaging and installing the client binaries for Windows is the popular Inno Setup program. This tool is completely free of charge and supports almost every windows release since 2000.

Continue reading

bii internals: Automating MacOS pkg generation

In a previous posts we talked about how we cythonized and packaged biicode with pyinstaller. Now we will explain how to generate installers for the different systems, starting with mac. The problem with pkg generation is that most of the existing tutorials and references are xcode oriented, and we just wanted to use plain console.

Continue reading