Come to the Dark Side, we have t-shirts

In order to get started with biicode and support our open source project we launched a while back a our Darth Vader++ campaign in which anyone that uploaded any piece of code to our cloud and had it reused by any other user would receive for free our Darth Vader++ t-shirt. The campaign has been a huge success, many libs and frameworks have been uploaded and  most importantly reused in other projects. The campaign has put in contact many lib authors with people that have reused their code in ways they could not expect. Some other times, users just asked the authors or maintainers for use cases of their code and followed up with an example. Creating community, that’s what all this is about.

Come to the Dark Side and join the C and C++ siths

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Elecnor Deimos incorporates biicode as code discovery and prototyping tool

We recently inked Elecnor Deimos as our first corporate client (yay!). Elecnor Deimos is a top tech company with over 500 engineers in staff. They provide software solutions for different sectors ranging from aerospace and aeronautics and defense to transportation or telecommunications in a EU and worldwide levels. The relevance of their clients is descriptive of the quality of their products and services; a few of them are ESA (European Space Agency), NASA, European Union, Telefónica, Siemens, Nokia
For all these top-level companies they develop a huge variety of products like Satellite imagery, air navigation systems, environmental managing systems etc. All of which are top-knotch pieces of software. But what’s even better for their clients is that Elecnor Deimos is making a bold move to support and use modern technologies like biicode or CartoDB as we’ll explain later. This could only mean that a thriving software company is not only keeping its gained quality standards but also expanding their horizons into new sectors and technologies. Never stop moving!

Elecnor deimos

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biicode 3.0: open source, premium accounts and much more

On Wednesday we released biicode 3.0. The listicle of feature is as follows:

  • Open source release of client and common repositories, dev infraestructure re-made
  • Release of premium accounts for private blocks
  • Enabled OAuth with Github and Google
  • Fixed bug in C++ parser for using statements
  • Fixed bug in [tests] pattern that incorrectly affected dependencies
  • New Terms of Service, clarifying source code licenses and accounting for premium accounts and open source contributions
  • Fixed bug in user folder ”.biicode” path, some config files were stored out of it

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New Terms of Service

We talked about our old Terms of Service in a previous post and we explained then why we hadn’t paid enough attention to them while the developing the tool. The latter has evolved and added such degrees of complexity that the legal support for the users and the company needed a rethink and a rephrasing to say the least. And that’s exactly what we did: after consulting with our legal counselors and talking to companies that provide similar services, we have revamped the ToS, check the new ones here.

biicode's new Terms of service

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biicode goes open source

biicode is an open source C and C++ dependency manager that basically consists of two parts: a client installed in the user’s machine and a cloud populated with the best and most popular C and C++ libs and frameworks. To make one’s source code dependent on any of them, just use #includes. Today biicode is releasing the source code of the client and the common services as part of a programmatic, comprehensive, full-on open source roadmap.

One of the biggest aims of biicode’s founders was to provide a useful and modern tool for the C and C++ communities. Because some of us believe that, despite the wonderful adoption and usage numbers of both programming languages, the current programming environment is not the best to address the challenges the software industry needs. We are trying to improve this landscape by providing a multi-language, cross-platform dependency manager that incorporates CMake as build system. A transversal, multipurpose, open source tool.

Fortunately for us, there is a vast community of open source advocates amongst the C and C++ developers. Thus our step forward by welcoming the C and C++ communities to our development efforts. We have now on our side a whole army of developers and thus we feel stronger. Much stronger.
biicode is open sourcing its code base starting of by it's brand new open source client

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biicode is going open source: join us!

When one launches a product or service, one knows they’ll never sleep again 4 hours in a row.

Apocryphal, but probably muttered by our founder Diego Rodríguez-Losada any time during the biicode’s two-year existence.

Especially when your product tries to address a common problem to almost 4 million of C and C++ developers – probably the largest development community by language – that however lacks what in other languages is a basic and a widespread tool: a dependency manager. It is true that several initiatives exist, as RYPPL, Meson, Repobuild, CPMCPP, but unfortunately none of them seem to have a large adoption.

We are proud of where we came from and confident of what we have achieved. We have worked hard to build it, developing and iterating a lot: for example we changed our full codebase from java to python in the process, or rebuilt more than 50% of our codebase in 1,5 months to release v1.0. So we didn’t even consider about making biicode open source. Until today.

biicode open source campaign sticker

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